Kenneth E. Staten


Preferred Name: Ken

Nickname/Call Sign: Rock

Date of Birth: July 13, 1939 (November 7, 2018)

Highest Military Grade Held: Major General, (0-8)

Hometown: Mulvane. KS

Biography

Major General Kenneth E. Staten, USAF, Retired, was the owner, manager, and principle labor force for Lilac Hill Polled Herefords, Fayette, MO. His focus is to be a nationally recognized source of quality, predictable Polled Hereford genetics.
General Staten was born July 13, 1939, in Manhattan, KS and graduated from Mulvane High School, Mulvane, KS in 1957. He received a bachelor of science degree in military science from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1961, and master of science degree in systems management from the University of Southern California in 1974. He completed Squadron Officers School in 1965, Armed Forces Staff College in 1974, and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces in 1982.
After graduating from the Academy, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Air Force. The general entered pilot training at Webb Air Force Base, TX, was the top graduate of the first training class to fly the new T-38 trainer, and received his pilot wings in August 1962. After completing combat crew training at Luke Air Force Base, AZ., in May 1963, he was assigned to the 493rd Tactical Fighter Squadron, 48th Tactical Fighter Wing, RAF Lakenheath, England as an F-100 pilot. In May of 1966, he transferred to Bein Hoa Air Base, Republic of Vietnam, and flew 265 combat missions as an F-100 pilot with the 510th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing.
In June 1967, General Staten returned to the United States as an F-100 combat crew training instructor with the 27th Tactical Fighter Wing, Cannon AFB, NM. He completed the U.S. Air Force Aerospace Research Pilot School (now known as the Test Pilot School) at Edwards AFB, CA., in February 1969, and remained as an instructor.
General Staten became aide to the Commander, Air Force Systems Command, Andrews AFB, MD, in January 1971. After graduating from the Armed Forces Staff College, Norfolk, VA., in January 1974, he entered F-4 upgrade training with the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing at George AFB, CA.
In May 1974, he was assigned to the 4th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 432nd Tactical Fighter Wing, Udorn Royal Thai AFB, Thailand, as assistant operations officer and F-4 pilot. From June 1975 to July 1981, he served as fighter requirements officer, and later as special assistant to the deputy chief of staff for research and development at Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C. During these assignments, General Staten was part of the cadre of five officers that initiated the low observables “stealth” programs. He was the first program manager of the F-117.
After completing the Industrial College of the Armed Forces in July 1982, the general was assigned to the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School as Commandant. In August 1983, he became the commander of the 6510th Test Wing, Edwards AFB, CA, where he was responsible for all flight test activities at the world’s largest flight test base. In February 1986, he was assigned as the first program manager of the National Aerospace Plane Joint Program Office at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, which managed the technology and design programs for a hypersonic research vehicle (X-30).
In November 1987, the general was assigned to Hanscom AFB, MA, as Deputy Commander for Tactical Systems, Joint Tactical Information Distribution System and Airborne Warning and Control Systems, Electronic Systems Division. He was responsible for developing and procuring command, control, and communications systems for the U.S. and allied armed forces.
General Staten’s next position was commander of the Armament Division, Eglin AFB, FL, which later became the Munitions Systems Division. The Munitions Systems Division conducted planning, research, development, and acquisition for non-nuclear air armaments and munitions systems; completed test and evaluation of armament and electronic combat systems; and operated the largest Air Force base in the Free World.
He assumed his final active duty assignment in August, 1991, as the deputy chief of staff for test and resources, Headquarters Air Force Systems Command, Andrews AFB, Md. Test and resources encompassed the functional areas of test and evaluation, logistics, manpower, services, and civil engineering.
The general is a command pilot with more that 4,500 flying hours in more than 45 different types of aircraft. His military decorations and awards include the Distinguished Service Medal with oak leaf cluster, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit with oak leaf cluster, Distinguished Flying Cross, Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal with 14 oak leaf clusters, Air Force Commendation Medal with oak leaf cluster, Presidential Unit Citation, Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with 2 oak leaf clusters, Combat Readiness Medal, and Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm.
He was promoted to major general September 1, 1989, and was retired from active duty on September 1, 1992.
General Staten is married to the former Carol Virginia Nicholl of Plainview, Texas. They have two daughters, Heather and Courtney, and four grandchildren.
Beef Seed Stock Producer

Units Assigned

  • 1962-5/1963 Combat Crew Training School, Luke AFB, AZ
  • 5/1963-5/1966 493rd Tactical Fighter Squadron, 48th Tactical Fighter Wing, Lakenheath RAFB, England (F-100)
  • 5/1966/1967 510th Tactical Fighter Squadron/3rd Tactical Fighter Wing, Bien Hoa AB, Vietnam (F-100 – 265 missions)
  • 6/1967-2/1969 27th Tactical Fighter Wing, Combat Crew Training Instructor, Cannon AFB, NM (F-100)
  • 2/1969 USAF Aerospace Research Pilot School (now the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School), Instructor, Edwards AFB, CA
  • 1/1971 Aide to the commander, Air Force Systems Command, Andrews Air Force Base, MD
  • 1972-1974 Armed Forces Staff College, Norfolk, VA
  • 1/1974-5/1974 35th Tactical Fighter Wing, F-4 upgrade, George AFB, CA (F-4)
  • 5/1974-6/1975 4th Tactical Fighter Squadron/432nd Tactical Fighter Wing, Udorn Royal Thai AFB, Thailand
  • 6/1975-7/1981 Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Fighter requirements officer/Special assistant to the deputy chief of staff for research and development at, Washington, DC
  • 1981-1982  Industrial College of the Armed Forces
  • 7/1982-8/1983 USAF Test Pilot School,  Commandant
  • 8/1983-2/1986 6510th Test Wing, Edwards AFB, VA
  • 2/1986-11/1987 1st Program Manager, National Aerospace Plane Joint Program Office at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (X-30)
  • 11/1987 deputy commander for tactical systems, Joint Tactical Information Distribution System, and Airborne Warning and Control Systems, Electronic Systems Division, Hanscom Air Force MA
  • 8/1988 Armament Division/ Munitions Systems Division, Eglin AFB,
  • 7/1990-9/1992 Air Force Development Test Center
  • 9/1992 Retired USAF

Awards & Decorations

 Defense Superior Service Medal
 Legion of Merit (with Oak Leaf Cluster)
 Distinguished Flying Cross
 Meritorious Service Medal
 Air Medal (with 14 Oak Leaf Clusters)
 Air Force Commendation Medal (with Oak Leaf Cluster)
 Presidential Unit Citation
 Air Force Outstanding Unit Award (with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters)
 Combat Readiness Medal
 Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm

Flight Info

F-100
F-4
Flight Hours: 4000+ in more than 40 different aircraft

Military Education

  • 1957 Mulvane HS
  • 1957-1961 USAFA
  • 1961 BS, Military Science
  • 1969 US Air Force Aerospace Research Pilot School
  • 1972-1974 Armed Forces Staff College
  • 1981-1982 Industrial College of the Armed Forces

Civilian Education

  • 1974 MS, University of Southern California

Ken Staten brought Herefords to the top-secret world of military aircraft technology. Article by Sara Gugelmeyer from Spotlight on Service, Hereford World, July 2013

 Major General Kenneth E. Staten “Headed West” November 7, 2018
Major General Kenneth E. Staten passed away suddenly on his Fayette farm on November 7, 2018. He was 79 years old.
Here are the remarks by DH Williams from Ken’s Memorial Service held on March 29, 2019.
“There is so much more to describe a man other than words in a memorial. These words merely scratch the surface in describing the character, initiative, and leadership of Kenneth Staten.
I had the unique opportunity to observe this military officer over the span of almost his entire career, and witnessed: – his development in flying excellence, from F 100 to F 16; – his engineering skills from making ordnance ballistic tables available to all “Hun” drivers in USAFE on 5″ x 8″ cards to building a new weapons system; – his leadership skills from 1st Lieutenant fighter pilot to Major General in program management.
I first met Ken at RAF Lakenheath, England. We were both new guys, 1st lieutenants assigned to the 493rd Tactical Fighter Squadron (Yellowtails)/48th Tactical Fighter Wing ( Statue of Liberty Wing). Our primary mission was nuclear deterrence. We trained to deliver nuclear weapons on Soviet-held territory – the flight profile was high altitude to a descent point, fly low level to avoid enemy radar, dead reckon to the target, deliver the weapon (most likely an over the shoulder using LABS), escape the blast, climb out and return to Lakenheath (assuming Lakenheath was still there).
Our training area was France, Germany, and Scotland. Many times our route was way below minimums, but the mission was still completed. The 48th went beyond the rules on occasion.
Ken was ready for his initial Tac Eval check ride far earlier than most of his contemporaries and he passed his ride with flying colors. He pulled Victor Alert that night.
To maintain operational readiness, the Wing participated in gunnery camp every 6 months at Wheelus AB, near Tripoli, Egypt on the Mediterranian. The Wing sat Victor Alert (24/7). In every wing activity – each squadron was represented, equally. We had rivalries among the squadrons, as well as after great camaraderie across the Wing. The “Hun” drivers of the 48th were (and still are) a close-knit group. Ken Staten contributed greatly to the 493rd Tactical Fighter Squadron and the 48th Tactical Fighter Wing.
Not too long after we arrived, the Yellowtails hosted a Wing Fling, a “Lil Abner, Dog Patch Party”. While I will not go into the recipe for the dog patch punch, I will extol the virtues of Carol Staten and others who were pressed into service to make the party a success. Among the dog patch girls (Daisey Mays) were Carol Staten, Jean Riley, Jean Hatfield, Jean Williams, Pat Lilac and Barbie Nelson as Mammy Yocum. As you might guess, the party was a huge success.
As a result of his excellence in all areas of 48th TFW operations and leadership skills, Ken served as a member of the Wing Tac Eval Wing his last year at the ‘Heath.
In 1974, Ken and I were members of the 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing at Udorn RTAFB, Thailand. Our outfit was the 4th Tactical Fighter Squadron, the “Fuujins” (named after a Japanese Wind God). We were known as the “BAG OF WIND” Squadron, maybe for more than one reason. The Fuujins specialized in, among other areas, laser-guided weapons delivery, combining laser designation of the target with weapon delivery from the same aircraft (in those days, quite an accomplishment).
Ken, then a junior major, served as assistant ops officer and, as usual, was exemplary in flying ability, instruction, and leadership skills. Ken was the instigator of a weekly squadron “dine-in” at a local Thai restaurant, which was a huge morale booster for the Fuujins.
I left Thailand in 1974 for a coveted job in Fighter Requirements at the Pentagon. Soon thereafter the Staten family moved to Virginia and Ken was assigned to, where else, Fighter Requirements. Subsequently, Ken and I were chosen, with fighter pilot Joe Ralston, (also of Fighter Requirements), along with a few others to run a program to prove the advantages of stealth. Our job was to develop, test and deploy weapons systems which would be virtually invisible to enemy defense systems. The system we chose and subsequently built was extremely successful in the Gulf War and was a major advancement in combat capability.
With significant help from Lockheed Skunk Works and a few high ranking military officers and DOD civilians, this small group was responsible for every aspect of the airplane and its support: – range, endurance, performance; – engines, ordnance, avionics; communications; – operational concepts, contracting, security; – and many other details necessary to keep the program discreet, protect the technology and which led to the success of the F 117.
Ken Staten was a leader in making critical decisions on every aspect of this program and he never failed.
In 1986, I retired to Fort Walton Beach and soon afterward Ken and Carol arrived at Eglin AFB to command the Air Force Armament Division. Another success and still another at Lilac Hill Farms in Missouri.
From the early ’60s at Lakenheath and Wheelus, to Udorn Thailand, to the Pentagon, to Eglin, 48th TFW & SSS reunions, the lives of many have been very much enriched by Kenneth and Carol Staten and their family. Ken, may the wind always be beneath your wings and lift you up. GODSPEED!!

Biography

Biography

Major General Kenneth E. Staten, USAF, Retired, was the owner, manager, and principle labor force for Lilac Hill Polled Herefords, Fayette, MO. His focus is to be a nationally recognized source of quality, predictable Polled Hereford genetics.
General Staten was born July 13, 1939, in Manhattan, KS and graduated from Mulvane High School, Mulvane, KS in 1957. He received a bachelor of science degree in military science from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1961, and master of science degree in systems management from the University of Southern California in 1974. He completed Squadron Officers School in 1965, Armed Forces Staff College in 1974, and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces in 1982.
After graduating from the Academy, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Air Force. The general entered pilot training at Webb Air Force Base, TX, was the top graduate of the first training class to fly the new T-38 trainer, and received his pilot wings in August 1962. After completing combat crew training at Luke Air Force Base, AZ., in May 1963, he was assigned to the 493rd Tactical Fighter Squadron, 48th Tactical Fighter Wing, RAF Lakenheath, England as an F-100 pilot. In May of 1966, he transferred to Bein Hoa Air Base, Republic of Vietnam, and flew 265 combat missions as an F-100 pilot with the 510th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing.
In June 1967, General Staten returned to the United States as an F-100 combat crew training instructor with the 27th Tactical Fighter Wing, Cannon AFB, NM. He completed the U.S. Air Force Aerospace Research Pilot School (now known as the Test Pilot School) at Edwards AFB, CA., in February 1969, and remained as an instructor.
General Staten became aide to the Commander, Air Force Systems Command, Andrews AFB, MD, in January 1971. After graduating from the Armed Forces Staff College, Norfolk, VA., in January 1974, he entered F-4 upgrade training with the 35th Tactical Fighter Wing at George AFB, CA.
In May 1974, he was assigned to the 4th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 432nd Tactical Fighter Wing, Udorn Royal Thai AFB, Thailand, as assistant operations officer and F-4 pilot. From June 1975 to July 1981, he served as fighter requirements officer, and later as special assistant to the deputy chief of staff for research and development at Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C. During these assignments, General Staten was part of the cadre of five officers that initiated the low observables “stealth” programs. He was the first program manager of the F-117.
After completing the Industrial College of the Armed Forces in July 1982, the general was assigned to the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School as Commandant. In August 1983, he became the commander of the 6510th Test Wing, Edwards AFB, CA, where he was responsible for all flight test activities at the world’s largest flight test base. In February 1986, he was assigned as the first program manager of the National Aerospace Plane Joint Program Office at Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, which managed the technology and design programs for a hypersonic research vehicle (X-30).
In November 1987, the general was assigned to Hanscom AFB, MA, as Deputy Commander for Tactical Systems, Joint Tactical Information Distribution System and Airborne Warning and Control Systems, Electronic Systems Division. He was responsible for developing and procuring command, control, and communications systems for the U.S. and allied armed forces.
General Staten’s next position was commander of the Armament Division, Eglin AFB, FL, which later became the Munitions Systems Division. The Munitions Systems Division conducted planning, research, development, and acquisition for non-nuclear air armaments and munitions systems; completed test and evaluation of armament and electronic combat systems; and operated the largest Air Force base in the Free World.
He assumed his final active duty assignment in August, 1991, as the deputy chief of staff for test and resources, Headquarters Air Force Systems Command, Andrews AFB, Md. Test and resources encompassed the functional areas of test and evaluation, logistics, manpower, services, and civil engineering.
The general is a command pilot with more that 4,500 flying hours in more than 45 different types of aircraft. His military decorations and awards include the Distinguished Service Medal with oak leaf cluster, Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit with oak leaf cluster, Distinguished Flying Cross, Meritorious Service Medal, Air Medal with 14 oak leaf clusters, Air Force Commendation Medal with oak leaf cluster, Presidential Unit Citation, Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with 2 oak leaf clusters, Combat Readiness Medal, and Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm.
He was promoted to major general September 1, 1989, and was retired from active duty on September 1, 1992.
General Staten is married to the former Carol Virginia Nicholl of Plainview, Texas. They have two daughters, Heather and Courtney, and four grandchildren.
Beef Seed Stock Producer

Units - Education - Awards - Flight Info

Units Assigned

  • 1962-5/1963 Combat Crew Training School, Luke AFB, AZ
  • 5/1963-5/1966 493rd Tactical Fighter Squadron, 48th Tactical Fighter Wing, Lakenheath RAFB, England (F-100)
  • 5/1966/1967 510th Tactical Fighter Squadron/3rd Tactical Fighter Wing, Bien Hoa AB, Vietnam (F-100 – 265 missions)
  • 6/1967-2/1969 27th Tactical Fighter Wing, Combat Crew Training Instructor, Cannon AFB, NM (F-100)
  • 2/1969 USAF Aerospace Research Pilot School (now the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School), Instructor, Edwards AFB, CA
  • 1/1971 Aide to the commander, Air Force Systems Command, Andrews Air Force Base, MD
  • 1972-1974 Armed Forces Staff College, Norfolk, VA
  • 1/1974-5/1974 35th Tactical Fighter Wing, F-4 upgrade, George AFB, CA (F-4)
  • 5/1974-6/1975 4th Tactical Fighter Squadron/432nd Tactical Fighter Wing, Udorn Royal Thai AFB, Thailand
  • 6/1975-7/1981 Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Fighter requirements officer/Special assistant to the deputy chief of staff for research and development at, Washington, DC
  • 1981-1982  Industrial College of the Armed Forces
  • 7/1982-8/1983 USAF Test Pilot School,  Commandant
  • 8/1983-2/1986 6510th Test Wing, Edwards AFB, VA
  • 2/1986-11/1987 1st Program Manager, National Aerospace Plane Joint Program Office at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (X-30)
  • 11/1987 deputy commander for tactical systems, Joint Tactical Information Distribution System, and Airborne Warning and Control Systems, Electronic Systems Division, Hanscom Air Force MA
  • 8/1988 Armament Division/ Munitions Systems Division, Eglin AFB,
  • 7/1990-9/1992 Air Force Development Test Center
  • 9/1992 Retired USAF

Awards & Decorations

 Defense Superior Service Medal
 Legion of Merit (with Oak Leaf Cluster)
 Distinguished Flying Cross
 Meritorious Service Medal
 Air Medal (with 14 Oak Leaf Clusters)
 Air Force Commendation Medal (with Oak Leaf Cluster)
 Presidential Unit Citation
 Air Force Outstanding Unit Award (with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters)
 Combat Readiness Medal
 Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm

Flight Info

F-100
F-4
Flight Hours: 4000+ in more than 40 different aircraft

Military Education

  • 1957 Mulvane HS
  • 1957-1961 USAFA
  • 1961 BS, Military Science
  • 1969 US Air Force Aerospace Research Pilot School
  • 1972-1974 Armed Forces Staff College
  • 1981-1982 Industrial College of the Armed Forces

Civilian Education

  • 1974 MS, University of Southern California
Article about Ken Staten

Ken Staten brought Herefords to the top-secret world of military aircraft technology. Article by Sara Gugelmeyer from Spotlight on Service, Hereford World, July 2013

Headed West

 Major General Kenneth E. Staten “Headed West” November 7, 2018
Major General Kenneth E. Staten passed away suddenly on his Fayette farm on November 7, 2018. He was 79 years old.
Here are the remarks by DH Williams from Ken’s Memorial Service held on March 29, 2019.
“There is so much more to describe a man other than words in a memorial. These words merely scratch the surface in describing the character, initiative, and leadership of Kenneth Staten.
I had the unique opportunity to observe this military officer over the span of almost his entire career, and witnessed: – his development in flying excellence, from F 100 to F 16; – his engineering skills from making ordnance ballistic tables available to all “Hun” drivers in USAFE on 5″ x 8″ cards to building a new weapons system; – his leadership skills from 1st Lieutenant fighter pilot to Major General in program management.
I first met Ken at RAF Lakenheath, England. We were both new guys, 1st lieutenants assigned to the 493rd Tactical Fighter Squadron (Yellowtails)/48th Tactical Fighter Wing ( Statue of Liberty Wing). Our primary mission was nuclear deterrence. We trained to deliver nuclear weapons on Soviet-held territory – the flight profile was high altitude to a descent point, fly low level to avoid enemy radar, dead reckon to the target, deliver the weapon (most likely an over the shoulder using LABS), escape the blast, climb out and return to Lakenheath (assuming Lakenheath was still there).
Our training area was France, Germany, and Scotland. Many times our route was way below minimums, but the mission was still completed. The 48th went beyond the rules on occasion.
Ken was ready for his initial Tac Eval check ride far earlier than most of his contemporaries and he passed his ride with flying colors. He pulled Victor Alert that night.
To maintain operational readiness, the Wing participated in gunnery camp every 6 months at Wheelus AB, near Tripoli, Egypt on the Mediterranian. The Wing sat Victor Alert (24/7). In every wing activity – each squadron was represented, equally. We had rivalries among the squadrons, as well as after great camaraderie across the Wing. The “Hun” drivers of the 48th were (and still are) a close-knit group. Ken Staten contributed greatly to the 493rd Tactical Fighter Squadron and the 48th Tactical Fighter Wing.
Not too long after we arrived, the Yellowtails hosted a Wing Fling, a “Lil Abner, Dog Patch Party”. While I will not go into the recipe for the dog patch punch, I will extol the virtues of Carol Staten and others who were pressed into service to make the party a success. Among the dog patch girls (Daisey Mays) were Carol Staten, Jean Riley, Jean Hatfield, Jean Williams, Pat Lilac and Barbie Nelson as Mammy Yocum. As you might guess, the party was a huge success.
As a result of his excellence in all areas of 48th TFW operations and leadership skills, Ken served as a member of the Wing Tac Eval Wing his last year at the ‘Heath.
In 1974, Ken and I were members of the 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing at Udorn RTAFB, Thailand. Our outfit was the 4th Tactical Fighter Squadron, the “Fuujins” (named after a Japanese Wind God). We were known as the “BAG OF WIND” Squadron, maybe for more than one reason. The Fuujins specialized in, among other areas, laser-guided weapons delivery, combining laser designation of the target with weapon delivery from the same aircraft (in those days, quite an accomplishment).
Ken, then a junior major, served as assistant ops officer and, as usual, was exemplary in flying ability, instruction, and leadership skills. Ken was the instigator of a weekly squadron “dine-in” at a local Thai restaurant, which was a huge morale booster for the Fuujins.
I left Thailand in 1974 for a coveted job in Fighter Requirements at the Pentagon. Soon thereafter the Staten family moved to Virginia and Ken was assigned to, where else, Fighter Requirements. Subsequently, Ken and I were chosen, with fighter pilot Joe Ralston, (also of Fighter Requirements), along with a few others to run a program to prove the advantages of stealth. Our job was to develop, test and deploy weapons systems which would be virtually invisible to enemy defense systems. The system we chose and subsequently built was extremely successful in the Gulf War and was a major advancement in combat capability.
With significant help from Lockheed Skunk Works and a few high ranking military officers and DOD civilians, this small group was responsible for every aspect of the airplane and its support: – range, endurance, performance; – engines, ordnance, avionics; communications; – operational concepts, contracting, security; – and many other details necessary to keep the program discreet, protect the technology and which led to the success of the F 117.
Ken Staten was a leader in making critical decisions on every aspect of this program and he never failed.
In 1986, I retired to Fort Walton Beach and soon afterward Ken and Carol arrived at Eglin AFB to command the Air Force Armament Division. Another success and still another at Lilac Hill Farms in Missouri.
From the early ’60s at Lakenheath and Wheelus, to Udorn Thailand, to the Pentagon, to Eglin, 48th TFW & SSS reunions, the lives of many have been very much enriched by Kenneth and Carol Staten and their family. Ken, may the wind always be beneath your wings and lift you up. GODSPEED!!

Photos
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