William J. Eibach


 

Preferred Name: Bill

Nickname/Call Sign: Eibs

Date Of Birth: March 3, 1935

Highest Military Grade Held: Colonel, O6

Hometown: St. Petersburg, FL

Biography

Super Sabre Landings with Little to No Power
by:  Col (ret) William J. Eibach

During my 3000 plus hours of flying the Super Sabre it never let me down, ie, I never had to eject! However, I did come close a few times which were opportunities for me to test my flying skills, along with some luck.

  1. While stationed at Torrejon AFB in Spain, during a two-ship night refueling mission, I was on the tanker when I heard the boom operator say that he could see sparks coming out my tailpipe.  My engine was failing and I immediately stopping refueling and pulled the throttle to idle to reduce the pressure on the engine. I received vectors from the tanker for Moron AB in Spain. I then started a long slow descent to Moron.  I asked GCA to place me at 1000 AGL on final approach. All went well until the engine seized up. It wasn’t my greatest landing but acceptable for my first night no engine landing.
  2. On a TDY to Incirlik Turkey, I was leading a two-ship going to the Konya Range on a simulate nuclear delivery at 500 knots when the engine oil warning light came on and the oil pressure dropped to zero. I pulled the throttle back to idle and climbed up to base leg to Konya AB which, fortunately, was very close by. I declared an emergency with tower and was cleared to land against the traffic. I shut the engine down as I turned off the runway.  I was then towed to a hanger and was met by the base commander and he gave me a ride to his office. He then called Incirlik and requested they truck a new engine with a maintenance crew to Konya. I was told to stay put until the aircraft was repaired. The base commander loaned me his car and his aide while he went on leave. He asked me to help his aide with his English. I had a great time each evening visiting restaurants and bars while teaching English to his aide. After a couple of days, the engine arrived and was installed.  The problem was that a crew chief had dropped the cap off an oil sample bottle into the oil tank and the cap had lodged in the tank exit hose, which in turn shut off the oil supply.
  3. I was on a cross-country flight from Torrejon AFB to Wheelus AFB with the new 16th Air Force Vice Commander, Col Ralph Jenkins in the rear cockpit in an F-100F.  The flight proceeded normally to a point 130 NM north of Wheelus AFB when the A/C generator went off the line and the cockpit filled with smoke.  The A/C generator was reset and stayed on for approximately five minutes, after which it again failed. An air start was accomplished on the emergency fuel system and the power advanced to 90% rpm.  Instrument indications remained normal for approximately three minutes and then the second flameout occurred. Three subsequent engine flameouts and restarts were accomplished placing the aircraft over Wheelus at 13,000 feet.  Being in an ideal position for a flameout landing I discontinued further air start attempts and put the landing gear down and concentrated on the flameout landing pattern. Col Jenkins was briefed that if the pattern was not perfect at the base leg point we would eject.  The base leg position looked perfect and we both elected to land the aircraft. The approach was continued and the flameout landing successfully terminated. The investigation revealed that the CSD had failed and resulted in A/C power loss. The aft and intermediate boost and transfer pumps had failed and the D/C boost pump was also inoperative. By preventing the loss of the aircraft and crew, I was awarded the USAF “WELL DONE’ Award.
  4. Tuy Hoa, Vietnam 1970:  Sitting alert I was leading a flight of two when we were launched with vectors to Southern Vietnam.  The target was a Special Forces camp being overrun by the Viet Cong. We were contacted by FAC and advised to drop napalm on the south side of the revetment.  As I delivered my napalm on the revetment my left wing was hit by AAA. As I pulled off the target to the left I noted that my delivery had been on target and the revetment south wall was ablaze.  I then declared an emergency and headed to Tan Son Nhut for a straight in with minimum fuel landing. I landed successfully and as I taxied in my engine flamed out. I hitched a ride back to Tuy Hoa on an Army helicopter.  I was met by my Squadron Commander, Col Al Baker, who told me I had completed my combat with 250 missions and that my third tour in Vietnam was over. He informed me I was to lead a two-ship back to Clark AB in the Philippines to pick up a tanker for my trip back to the USA.

Colonel Eibach has been married to Evelyn D. (Finkle) Eibach for 48 years.  Evelyn was a former DOD teacher for many years.

Units Assigned

  • 1/1958-1/1959 Student Pilot, Bainbridge AB, GA/ Laredo AFB, TX (T-34, T-28, T-33)
  • 2/1959-12/1959 Fighter Training, Luke AFB, AZ/ Nellis AFB, NV (F-100 C/D)
  • 1/1960-6/1961 510th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Clark AB, Philippines (F-100 A/D)
  • 6/1961-6/1963 35th Tactical Fighter Squadron & 36th Tactical Fighter Squadron. Itazuke AB, Japan (F-100D)
  • 6/1963-4/1966 613th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Flt. Commander, England AFB, LA, TDY: Vietnam(x3),Europe(x2), (F-100D)
  • 4/1966-4/1969 401st Tactical Fighter Wing, Stan. Eval., Torrejon AB, Spain (F-100D)
  • 11/1969-7/1970 355th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Flt.Commander, Tuy Hoa AB, Vietnam (F-100D)
  • 7/1970-2/1972 Headquarters 9AF Stan Eval, Shaw AFB, SC (F-100D, T-33)
  • 2/1972-7/1975 Ops. Officer Det.1,2nd ADGp, Hickam AFB, HI (T-33)
  • 7/1975-6/1976 Air War College, Maxwell AFB, AL (Distinguished Graduate).
  • 8/1976-3/1977 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing, Chief Weapons & Tactics, Clark AB, Philippines (F-4E)
  • 3/1977-3/1979 3rd Tactical Fighter Squadron, Clark AB, Philippines, (F-4E)
  • 7/1979-7/1981 ACoS Plans & Programs, JUSMAG-K, Seoul, Korea
  • 7/1981-7/1984 Director Command & Control/ Dir. TAC Ops., HQ, PACAF, Hickam AFB, HI
  • 7/1984-9/1987 Dep. IG, CENTCOM. MacDill AFB, FL
  • 9/31/1987 Retired after 30 years of continuous Active Duty

Awards & Decorations

 Defense Superior Service Medal
 Legion of Merit
 Distinguished Flying Cross
 Defense Meritorious Service Medal
 Meritorious Service Medal (with 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)
 Air Medal (with 1 Silver Oak Leaf Cluster, 4 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters)
 AF Commendation Medal (with 1 Oak Leaf Cluster)
 AF Outstanding Unit Award (with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters)
 Combat Readiness Medal (with 1 Oak Leaf Cluster)
 National Defense Service Medal
 Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
 Vietnam Service Medal
 AF Overseas Short Tour Ribbon
 AF Overseas Long Tour Ribbon (with 1 Silver Oak Leaf Cluster, 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)
 AF Longevity Service Award Ribbon (with 1 Silver Oak Leaf Cluster, 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)
 Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon (with 1 Oak Leaf Cluster)
 AF Training Ribbon
 Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal  

Flight Info

Student – 251 hrs
T-38 – 22 hrs
T-33 – 458 hrs
F- 100 A/C/D/F – 2682 hrs  (including 539 hrs as IP)
F-100 D – 343 Combat hrs, Vietnam
F-4 E – 246 hrs

Total Flight Hours – 3349 hrs   

Military Education

  • 6/1965 Squadron Officer School (Correspondence)
  • 1967- Air War College, Maxwell AFB, AL (Distinguished Graduate)
  • 8/1973 Command & Staff College ( Seminar)
  • TAC Life Support School
  • USAF Advanced Survival Training Course
  • 5 AF Water Survival
  • IPIS T-38 Course
  • PACAF Jungle Survival School
  • USAFAGOS Battle Staff Course
  • DISAM Course
  • C3CM Sen TAC Battle Mgr Course
  • Flag Off. Nuclear Accident Course
  • AF IG Inspection School

Civilian Education

  • 1957 – BA, St. Olaf College, MN.
  • 1967- MPS, Auburn University, AL
Biography

Biography

Super Sabre Landings with Little to No Power
by:  Col (ret) William J. Eibach

During my 3000 plus hours of flying the Super Sabre it never let me down, ie, I never had to eject! However, I did come close a few times which were opportunities for me to test my flying skills, along with some luck.

  1. While stationed at Torrejon AFB in Spain, during a two-ship night refueling mission, I was on the tanker when I heard the boom operator say that he could see sparks coming out my tailpipe.  My engine was failing and I immediately stopping refueling and pulled the throttle to idle to reduce the pressure on the engine. I received vectors from the tanker for Moron AB in Spain. I then started a long slow descent to Moron.  I asked GCA to place me at 1000 AGL on final approach. All went well until the engine seized up. It wasn’t my greatest landing but acceptable for my first night no engine landing.
  2. On a TDY to Incirlik Turkey, I was leading a two-ship going to the Konya Range on a simulate nuclear delivery at 500 knots when the engine oil warning light came on and the oil pressure dropped to zero. I pulled the throttle back to idle and climbed up to base leg to Konya AB which, fortunately, was very close by. I declared an emergency with tower and was cleared to land against the traffic. I shut the engine down as I turned off the runway.  I was then towed to a hanger and was met by the base commander and he gave me a ride to his office. He then called Incirlik and requested they truck a new engine with a maintenance crew to Konya. I was told to stay put until the aircraft was repaired. The base commander loaned me his car and his aide while he went on leave. He asked me to help his aide with his English. I had a great time each evening visiting restaurants and bars while teaching English to his aide. After a couple of days, the engine arrived and was installed.  The problem was that a crew chief had dropped the cap off an oil sample bottle into the oil tank and the cap had lodged in the tank exit hose, which in turn shut off the oil supply.
  3. I was on a cross-country flight from Torrejon AFB to Wheelus AFB with the new 16th Air Force Vice Commander, Col Ralph Jenkins in the rear cockpit in an F-100F.  The flight proceeded normally to a point 130 NM north of Wheelus AFB when the A/C generator went off the line and the cockpit filled with smoke.  The A/C generator was reset and stayed on for approximately five minutes, after which it again failed. An air start was accomplished on the emergency fuel system and the power advanced to 90% rpm.  Instrument indications remained normal for approximately three minutes and then the second flameout occurred. Three subsequent engine flameouts and restarts were accomplished placing the aircraft over Wheelus at 13,000 feet.  Being in an ideal position for a flameout landing I discontinued further air start attempts and put the landing gear down and concentrated on the flameout landing pattern. Col Jenkins was briefed that if the pattern was not perfect at the base leg point we would eject.  The base leg position looked perfect and we both elected to land the aircraft. The approach was continued and the flameout landing successfully terminated. The investigation revealed that the CSD had failed and resulted in A/C power loss. The aft and intermediate boost and transfer pumps had failed and the D/C boost pump was also inoperative. By preventing the loss of the aircraft and crew, I was awarded the USAF “WELL DONE’ Award.
  4. Tuy Hoa, Vietnam 1970:  Sitting alert I was leading a flight of two when we were launched with vectors to Southern Vietnam.  The target was a Special Forces camp being overrun by the Viet Cong. We were contacted by FAC and advised to drop napalm on the south side of the revetment.  As I delivered my napalm on the revetment my left wing was hit by AAA. As I pulled off the target to the left I noted that my delivery had been on target and the revetment south wall was ablaze.  I then declared an emergency and headed to Tan Son Nhut for a straight in with minimum fuel landing. I landed successfully and as I taxied in my engine flamed out. I hitched a ride back to Tuy Hoa on an Army helicopter.  I was met by my Squadron Commander, Col Al Baker, who told me I had completed my combat with 250 missions and that my third tour in Vietnam was over. He informed me I was to lead a two-ship back to Clark AB in the Philippines to pick up a tanker for my trip back to the USA.

Colonel Eibach has been married to Evelyn D. (Finkle) Eibach for 48 years.  Evelyn was a former DOD teacher for many years.

Units - Education - Awards - Flight Info

Units Assigned

  • 1/1958-1/1959 Student Pilot, Bainbridge AB, GA/ Laredo AFB, TX (T-34, T-28, T-33)
  • 2/1959-12/1959 Fighter Training, Luke AFB, AZ/ Nellis AFB, NV (F-100 C/D)
  • 1/1960-6/1961 510th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Clark AB, Philippines (F-100 A/D)
  • 6/1961-6/1963 35th Tactical Fighter Squadron & 36th Tactical Fighter Squadron. Itazuke AB, Japan (F-100D)
  • 6/1963-4/1966 613th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Flt. Commander, England AFB, LA, TDY: Vietnam(x3),Europe(x2), (F-100D)
  • 4/1966-4/1969 401st Tactical Fighter Wing, Stan. Eval., Torrejon AB, Spain (F-100D)
  • 11/1969-7/1970 355th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Flt.Commander, Tuy Hoa AB, Vietnam (F-100D)
  • 7/1970-2/1972 Headquarters 9AF Stan Eval, Shaw AFB, SC (F-100D, T-33)
  • 2/1972-7/1975 Ops. Officer Det.1,2nd ADGp, Hickam AFB, HI (T-33)
  • 7/1975-6/1976 Air War College, Maxwell AFB, AL (Distinguished Graduate).
  • 8/1976-3/1977 3rd Tactical Fighter Wing, Chief Weapons & Tactics, Clark AB, Philippines (F-4E)
  • 3/1977-3/1979 3rd Tactical Fighter Squadron, Clark AB, Philippines, (F-4E)
  • 7/1979-7/1981 ACoS Plans & Programs, JUSMAG-K, Seoul, Korea
  • 7/1981-7/1984 Director Command & Control/ Dir. TAC Ops., HQ, PACAF, Hickam AFB, HI
  • 7/1984-9/1987 Dep. IG, CENTCOM. MacDill AFB, FL
  • 9/31/1987 Retired after 30 years of continuous Active Duty

Awards & Decorations

 Defense Superior Service Medal
 Legion of Merit
 Distinguished Flying Cross
 Defense Meritorious Service Medal
 Meritorious Service Medal (with 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)
 Air Medal (with 1 Silver Oak Leaf Cluster, 4 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters)
 AF Commendation Medal (with 1 Oak Leaf Cluster)
 AF Outstanding Unit Award (with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters)
 Combat Readiness Medal (with 1 Oak Leaf Cluster)
 National Defense Service Medal
 Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
 Vietnam Service Medal
 AF Overseas Short Tour Ribbon
 AF Overseas Long Tour Ribbon (with 1 Silver Oak Leaf Cluster, 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)
 AF Longevity Service Award Ribbon (with 1 Silver Oak Leaf Cluster, 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster)
 Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon (with 1 Oak Leaf Cluster)
 AF Training Ribbon
 Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal  

Flight Info

Student – 251 hrs
T-38 – 22 hrs
T-33 – 458 hrs
F- 100 A/C/D/F – 2682 hrs  (including 539 hrs as IP)
F-100 D – 343 Combat hrs, Vietnam
F-4 E – 246 hrs

Total Flight Hours – 3349 hrs   

Military Education

  • 6/1965 Squadron Officer School (Correspondence)
  • 1967- Air War College, Maxwell AFB, AL (Distinguished Graduate)
  • 8/1973 Command & Staff College ( Seminar)
  • TAC Life Support School
  • USAF Advanced Survival Training Course
  • 5 AF Water Survival
  • IPIS T-38 Course
  • PACAF Jungle Survival School
  • USAFAGOS Battle Staff Course
  • DISAM Course
  • C3CM Sen TAC Battle Mgr Course
  • Flag Off. Nuclear Accident Course
  • AF IG Inspection School

Civilian Education

  • 1957 – BA, St. Olaf College, MN.
  • 1967- MPS, Auburn University, AL