Don D. Wolfe



Preferred Name:
DD

Nickname/Call Sign: Wolfman, wm

Date of Birth: September 18, 1953

Highest Military Grade Held:

Hometown: 

Biography

I flew the F-100 in the Ohio Air National Guard with the 112th TFS (1975-79). During UPT pilot training, the F-100 was used as an example of an underpowered fighter, with adverse yaw, inertial coupling, compressor stalls and generally poor table manners. The “Sabre Dance” flick was shown to us several times to illustrate the point.
While at UPT my ANG unit lost three jets, killing the base commander, a first lieutenant and leaving two other pilots seriously injured. About the same time, my close friend “Trashcan” Ashcraft deadsticked a Hun from over the overrun after the engine quit from a
massive fuel leak. With these thoughts in mind, I began F-100 RTU in Tucson with the 162nd TFG.
The IP’s at Tucson were an experienced group of fighter pilots. I had the good fortune of flying with many of the “Misty” FACS that had become IPs there. It was an honor to have men like that teaching us the trade. There were many “characters” in that group of IPs that
flew a great jet and provided “entertainment” as well. So it was that I had a memorable sortie with IP Willie Wilson.
It was maybe ride eight or nine: a low level with some formation work. Willie’s briefing concerned topics and techniques that I’d never heard of. As I sat there with a puzzled look on my face, Willie asked me what was wrong. I told him that I didn’t have a clue what he was talking about. He said; “OK smart boy, you do the briefing!”
GOTCHA #1: Have the student do the brief so the IP can find out how much or LITTLE you know.
It was a hot summer afternoon when we taxied the F-100s on to the runway. I was the perfect example from Air Training Command: both visors down, mask on, sleeves down and gloves on. Willie on the other hand was exactly the OPPOSITE! He stopped the jet, looked over at me, pointed, and gave the runup signal. He pointed again, gave a “head nod,” stroked the blower, and we were on our way.
I sat out there on the wing working my butt off to stay in position while Willie proceeded to “get dressed” during the takeoff roll. He looked over at me, smiled, and put on the mask. Another look and the visor went down. “Line Check Speed,” and an OK signal.
About halfway down the runway, he held his hands up and put his gloves on one at a
time, tucking each finger like a surgeon. When both gloves were on, he flexed his hands above the glare shield, and then rotated the jet for takeoff. As we climbed out I was thinking: “What the hell was that?”
GOTCHA #2: Willie’s antics on that ride took the edge off of my concerns about the Super Sabre. If a guy could reach a point where he could fly and act cool like Willie, maybe this jet wasn’t so bad after all. I flew the F-100 for four years and really enjoyed the experience…although I never did forget the only two boldface procedures that really
mattered: “REJECT and EJECT!” ☻
(From Intake Issue 6, Spring 2008)

Units Assigned

  • RTU 162nd Tactical Fighter Group, Davis-Monthan AZ (F-100)
  • 1974-1979 112th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Ohio ANG (F-100)

Awards & Decorations

Flight Info

F-100

Military Education

Civilian Education

Biography

Biography

I flew the F-100 in the Ohio Air National Guard with the 112th TFS (1975-79). During UPT pilot training, the F-100 was used as an example of an underpowered fighter, with adverse yaw, inertial coupling, compressor stalls and generally poor table manners. The “Sabre Dance” flick was shown to us several times to illustrate the point.
While at UPT my ANG unit lost three jets, killing the base commander, a first lieutenant and leaving two other pilots seriously injured. About the same time, my close friend “Trashcan” Ashcraft deadsticked a Hun from over the overrun after the engine quit from a
massive fuel leak. With these thoughts in mind, I began F-100 RTU in Tucson with the 162nd TFG.
The IP’s at Tucson were an experienced group of fighter pilots. I had the good fortune of flying with many of the “Misty” FACS that had become IPs there. It was an honor to have men like that teaching us the trade. There were many “characters” in that group of IPs that
flew a great jet and provided “entertainment” as well. So it was that I had a memorable sortie with IP Willie Wilson.
It was maybe ride eight or nine: a low level with some formation work. Willie’s briefing concerned topics and techniques that I’d never heard of. As I sat there with a puzzled look on my face, Willie asked me what was wrong. I told him that I didn’t have a clue what he was talking about. He said; “OK smart boy, you do the briefing!”
GOTCHA #1: Have the student do the brief so the IP can find out how much or LITTLE you know.
It was a hot summer afternoon when we taxied the F-100s on to the runway. I was the perfect example from Air Training Command: both visors down, mask on, sleeves down and gloves on. Willie on the other hand was exactly the OPPOSITE! He stopped the jet, looked over at me, pointed, and gave the runup signal. He pointed again, gave a “head nod,” stroked the blower, and we were on our way.
I sat out there on the wing working my butt off to stay in position while Willie proceeded to “get dressed” during the takeoff roll. He looked over at me, smiled, and put on the mask. Another look and the visor went down. “Line Check Speed,” and an OK signal.
About halfway down the runway, he held his hands up and put his gloves on one at a
time, tucking each finger like a surgeon. When both gloves were on, he flexed his hands above the glare shield, and then rotated the jet for takeoff. As we climbed out I was thinking: “What the hell was that?”
GOTCHA #2: Willie’s antics on that ride took the edge off of my concerns about the Super Sabre. If a guy could reach a point where he could fly and act cool like Willie, maybe this jet wasn’t so bad after all. I flew the F-100 for four years and really enjoyed the experience…although I never did forget the only two boldface procedures that really
mattered: “REJECT and EJECT!” ☻
(From Intake Issue 6, Spring 2008)

Units - Education - Awards - Flight Info

Units Assigned

  • RTU 162nd Tactical Fighter Group, Davis-Monthan AZ (F-100)
  • 1974-1979 112th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Ohio ANG (F-100)

Awards & Decorations

Flight Info

F-100

Military Education

Civilian Education

Photos
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