William A. Gorton


Preferred Name: Bill

Nickname/Call Sign: Jaws

Date Of Birth: October 31, 1933

Highest Military Grade Held: Major General

Hometown: Providence, RI/Cocoa, FL

Biography

The years I flew the F-100

It never dawned on me that I wouldn’t be a fighter pilot.  My earliest memories were about flying. My father, A.W. Gorton, was a pioneer naval aviator.  He received his wings and commission in 1917. He was naval aviator number 1,720, a test pilot, a member of the U.S. Navy racing team, set numerous world speed records and winner of the Curtiss Marine Trophy. He resigned his commission in 1928 and was flying a Tri-Motor Ford in 1933 when I was born.  According to my mother, before I was one year old while sitting in her lap, I made my first flight with Dad in the Ford. (Photo #1) In early 1941 Dad was recalled to the Navy and I spent much of the war growing up on Naval air stations. That’s when I knew I wanted to become a Navy fighter pilot. After an unsuccessful attempt at college, I left school in 1954 with intent to enlist in the U.S. Navy Aviation Cadet program.  My father, however, suggested I’d have a better chance of becoming a fighter pilot if I joined the USAF. So on 23 February 1954, I enlisted in the USAF as an Aviation Cadet.

I received my wings and commission at Williams AFB, AZ on 1 June 1955 with an assignment to fly F-100s.  After T-33 gunnery at Del Rio TX, I went to Nellis AFB, NV to fly F-100s. I was supposed to be in the first F-100 class at Nellis but they unable to keep a sufficient number operational so they put us in an F-86 class.  Looking back I am glad they did. Flying the F-86 was a fantastic experience. (Photo 2)

I reported to the 436th Fighter Day Squadron at George AFB to fly F-100s in November 1955.

F-100A

I checked out in the F-100A on 18 Jan 1956.   I flew the A for 74 sorties, most of them in a clean configuration, many times three sorties a day.  I accumulate 76:05 hours in the A in just over 2 months. In April 56 the wing converted to F-100Cs.  

It was a great time to be assigned to George AFB.  Many Korean Aces were at George and they taught us a lot.  In the three years of flying As and Cs at George, I learned how to fly fighters.  Most of the sorties we flew were 2v2 or 4v4. Of course, in those days it was all Welded-Wing — shut up, and check 6. 

My first flight commander was Pete Fernandez, 14.5 MiG kills in Korea.  The As at George at the time of my checkout were all big tail, but the concern remained about controlling adverse yaw, particularly getting behind the power curve … and particularly by brand new brown bars!  I remember well the guidance Pete gave me … “Never let the jet get below 200 Kts on the base to final turn.”   I figured if an ace with 14.5 MiG kills kept it at 200 Kts, I would add 5 or 10 more just for my inexperience.  As you will remember the F-100 drag chute limit for deployment was 180 Kts. I would hate to tell you how many times after I lowered the nose gear I waited till the jet slowed below 180.  As a consequence, we blew a lot of tires (boy, the magnesium sure burns bright) trying to stop the jet before hitting the barrier.  Blowing tires was accepted, but Bull Harris our Wing CC would ship you off to SAC missiles if you got a tail skid on landing.  So we kept the power up even after Bob Hover demonstrated how to properly land the F-100.  A tail skid or worse got you an invitation to the pleasures of sitting in a SAC missile silo.

I had the privilege of flying Pete’s wing many times while rat racing and he was by far the smoothest and easiest lead I ever flew with.

Regarding adverse yaw, it was the nature of the beast and we learned how to deal with it. Early on, however, I didn’t understand what was happening that caused the jet to yaw to the point of departure. I just kept on cross controlling to keep it turning until the tail was about to take the lead and then I unloaded a bit.  

To illustrate my lack of understanding of what was going on, frequently after unloading I would have to use the rudder trim to center the ball!  It never dawned on me that something other than adverse yaw was occurring until one day in a debrief I commented to my flight lead, Gordon Scharnhorst, on the need to retrim the jet. Suspecting it was mechanical; he took me out to an A and told me to get in.  Because I was six feet four I always ran the seat full down. He immediately found the problem. When pulling Gs and stepping on right rudder while cross controlling the jet the connection between the thigh and calf bladder of my G-suit inflated pushing the rudder trim to the left.  Therefore unwittingly, I was responsible for the installation of a guard on the rudder trim switch — a very minor claim to fame to say the least!

F-100C

I checked out in the F-100C on 30 April 1956.  Many changes came with the introduction of the C models; we had additional fuel in the wings, antiskid, started to air refueling and an upgraded J-57 engine.  Also, the 479th Day Fighter Wing became the 479th Tactical Fighter Wing and we started flying ground attack training missions.  When we became a TFW the squadron UE went from 24 to 18 and we added the 476TFS. (Photo #3) L to R: Phil Edsal, Dick Derick, Dave Clardy, Bill Spencer, me. In front are, Maj Bob Schimp Squadron CC and Col Bull Harris, Wing CC.  All except me have now flown West.

Most importantly, with the C we had J-57s with more thrust.  The A model J-57 was rated dry at 9,220 and 14,800 in afterburner.  The C model J-57 was rated dry at 10,200 and 16,000 in burner. When we picked up a new Cs at Palmdale the engines were trimmed to their max rated power.  So for the 45-minute flight to George, we flew the best jets, clean and fast. By climbing to 40 K and pushing the jet over to half–g and lighting the burner I easily attained 1.5 Mach on most new C flights.  Of course, upon landing at George the C’s like the A’s, the J-57s were trimmed down to extend the engine life — so we were told.

As for the wet wings, we liked having more internal fuel, but at George, in the summer heat, they leaked on the ramp.  Later NA came up with better ceils and they, for the most part, solved the fuel leak problem.

The anti-skid was more of a problem.  Initially, we kept the anti-skid engaged until we shut down in the refueling pits —- that is until we had a jet go through the pit with the anti-skid merrily preventing the brakes from working.  After someone had the same problem in the de-arming area, we were instructed to turn antiskid off when exiting the runway. Of course, there were also cases when the antiskid malfunctioned on landing that resulted in blown tires.  

Initial attempts at air refueling were, to put it mildly, exciting.  As far as I know, the 479TFW was the first operational unit to undertake air refueling.  (Might have been Forster, but in any case, we had only limited info on how to do it.) We used KB50 tankers with the original C model short, straight refueling probe.  Because the C didn’t have flaps, we were very close to minimum airspeed at hookup and a pretty high angle of attack. As you approached the basket the airflow around the nose of the jet sucked it down and out of sight. Because of the slow speed, high angle of attack, all initial engagements with the basket were made blind.  This resulted in some amazing misses. I recall one missed engagement that resulted in basket and hose going over the wing, lopping over the fuselage and nearly hitting the left horizontal stabilizer. In a number of cases, the basket cracked canopies. The boys at NA attempted to help by modifying the nozzle on the short probe to have a 6-degree down angle.  That helped increase the number of successful engagements, but it did not solve the blind hookup problem. That wasn’t solved until they came up with big bent up refueling probe on the D model.

Even though, as TFS we were now hurling our pink bodies at the ground in dive, strafe, and skip bombing at Cuddyback Range, we still flew plenty of ACM and hot missions on the rag.

One thing I got to do while I was in the 436th FDS was to fly my father in a T-33.  It was a great experience for both of us. In fact, the landing approach speed for landing the T-33 was faster than many of the speed records he set in early naval aviation.  (Photo #4)

Of all the Huns I had the privilege to fly, the C was by far the best.  I flew Cs at George until Aug 58 when I transferred to Etain AB, France, and the F-100D.

Europe and the F-100 D

I arrived at Etain Air Base, France in August 1958 on a cold, cloudy afternoon.  The ceiling appeared to me to be around 500 feet. As we drove on the base two things got my attention.  First, all the aircraft parked on the rosettes were listing to the left because they had two external fuel tanks on the right wing and only one on the left.  I soon learned that this asymmetrical configuration allowed for the quick upload of a nuclear weapon on the left intermediate station and that we would fly almost all our routine mission in that configuration.    The second thing that got my attention was when I saw two Huns appear out of the murk in the same asymmetrical configuration and land in formation! For a jet driver that had spent over three years flying mostly under cloudless conditions in the West, it was clear to me this assignment was going to be a major change, not just in mission but also in ‘normal’ flying weather.

I was assigned to the 8th TFS of the 49th TFW.   It had been just over seven months since the 49th wing had converted from flying F-86s to F-100s.  Upon checking in to my new squadron I became the most experienced F-100 pilot in the squadron.  My 750 hours in the Hun was greater than the combined total of the squadron.

Even though Etain AB was the home of the 49th we did not pull nuclear alert in France.  The French government prohibited U.S. nuclear weapons in France so we pulled nuclear alert at Spangdahlem Air Base in Germany.  Our alert pad at Spang was typical. We were on15-minute alert 24 hours a day. Initially, the aircraft was loaded with MK 12 nuclear weapons.  As our older versions of the F-100D were replaced with the dash 90Ds and we upgraded to MK 28 nuclear weapon, which could be loaded on the centerline station,  We then were able to drop the 1-E asymmetrical three external tank configuration and go to a four tank symmetrical configuration.

In early 1959 I was selected to join a Headquarters USAFE special training team.  The team was formed for the purpose of training pilots in nuclear weapons delivery in French, Danish, and Turkish fighter units that had recently re-equipped with F-100Ds.  I was assigned as team weapons officer. I spent nearly 18 months on the team training Turkish and Danish squadrons.

Turkey

We trained two Turk squadrons, the 111th and 112th, at Eskisehir, Turkey (Photo #5).   It took about four months to train each squadron.  One of my first jobs was to assist the Turks in laying out the run-in line on their gunnery range at Konia.  (For all of you that flew on the Konia range, my apologies. Little did I know that Konia was dead center on the Stork migration route.  It wasn’t until we were training the second squadron that I had the occasion to pass close by one of those critters while at 500kts at 500 feet above the ground!  Thank God we never hit one during training of the Turks.)

Conclusion

From the first fighter I flew, the F-86, in 1955 until the last fighter I flew, the F-16, in 1985 the day before I retired, I was fortunate to do exactly what I set out to do.  In 1955, I was full of attitude and not much brains and the F-100 as by far the hottest airplane in the Air Force at that time. It was the jet that every fighter pilot wanted to fly.  I was one of the lucky ones. Flying the F-100 I learned a lot about flying single seat, single engine jet fighters. In 32 years in the AF, I was fortunate to be operationally qualified to fly the best jet fighters in the Air Force, but it was the 1,700 hours in the Hun that taught me the most and demanded the most of my limited skills.

Units Assigned

  • 1955 – 1955 94th Fighter Squadron, Nellis AFB, NV (F-86E/F)
  • 1955 – 1956 436th Fighter Day Squadron, George AFB, CA (F-100A)
  • 1956 – 1958 476th Fighter Day Squadron, George AFB, CA (F-100C)
  • 1958 – 1961 8th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Etain AB, France and Spangdahlem AB, Germany with one year with 112th and 111th Turkish TFS Eskisehir Tukey and six months with the 727th TFS Karup Denmark all in (F-100D)
  • 1961 – 1962 436th Tactical Fighter Squadron, George AFB, CA (F-104C)
  • 1962 – 1963 435th Tactical Fighter Squadron, George AFB, CA (F-104C)
  • 1963 – 1965 ALO 1st Bde, 101 Abn Div, Ft Campbell, KY (F-84F with Springfield, IL ANG)
  • 1965 – 1966 ALO 1st Bde, 101 Abn Div, RVN (O-1)
  • 1966 – 1967 Fighter Ops, Hq TAC, Langley AFB, VA
  • 1967 – 1968 Univ of Omaha, Omaha, NE
  • 1968 – 1969 Air Command and Staff, Maxwell AFB, AL
  • 1969 – 1971 Hq USAF, AO in Plans and Policy, Pentagon, Washington, D.C.
  • 1971 – 1972 Student, Canadian National Defense College, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
  • 1972 – 1972 (6 months) B Course student in F4-Cs Luke AFB, AZ en route to Thailand
  • 1972 – 1973 Ex to the Dir Plans and Operations, Hq USAF, Pentagon, Washington, D.C.
  • 1973 – 1976 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, ADO, DO and Vice CC, Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson, AZ (A-7)
  • 1976 – 1977 602nd Tactical Control Wing CC (OV-10, O-2)
  • 1977 – 1978 Staff officer in DO shop at Hq TAC, Langley AFB, VA
  • 1978 – 1980 31st Tactical Fighter Wing, CC (F-4E)
  • 1980 – 1981 832nd Air Division CC, Luke AFB, AZ (F-4C, F-15, F-104G, F-5)
  • 1981 – 1982 Dir Plans, Hq TAC, Langley AFB, VA
  • 1982 – 1984 Director of Operational Requirements, Hq USAF, Pentagon
  • 1984 – 1985 16th AF CC, Torrejon AB, Spain (F-16)
  • Retired from USAF, October 1, 1985

Awards & Decorations

 Distinguished Service Medal
 Legion of Merit (with oak leaf cluster)
 Distinguished Flying Cross (with oak leaf cluster)
 Bronze Star Medal
 Meritorious Service Medal (with 2 oak leaf clusters)
 Air Medal (4 oak leaf clusters)
 Air Force Commendation Medal
 Army Commendation Medal (with oak leaf cluster)
 Combat Readiness Medal

Flight Info

F-86E/F
F-100 A/C/D
F-104 C/G
F-84
O-1
O-2
A-7
OV-10
F-4 C/E
F-5
F-15
F-16

Military Education

1954 Enlisted AvCavs
1955 Pilot Class 55 O
1961 Squadron Officer’s Course
1969 Air Command and Staff DG
1971-1972 Canadian National Defense College

Civilian Education

1952 Cocoa HS
1952 1952-1953 Georgia Tech
1968 BGS University of Omaha
1969 MBA Auburn University

I checked out in the F-100A on 20 January 1956 and flew A’s till 30 Apr 1956 when we got F-100C’s.  Flew C’s till I transferred to Etain AB in August 1958.

Biography

Biography

The years I flew the F-100

It never dawned on me that I wouldn’t be a fighter pilot.  My earliest memories were about flying. My father, A.W. Gorton, was a pioneer naval aviator.  He received his wings and commission in 1917. He was naval aviator number 1,720, a test pilot, a member of the U.S. Navy racing team, set numerous world speed records and winner of the Curtiss Marine Trophy. He resigned his commission in 1928 and was flying a Tri-Motor Ford in 1933 when I was born.  According to my mother, before I was one year old while sitting in her lap, I made my first flight with Dad in the Ford. (Photo #1) In early 1941 Dad was recalled to the Navy and I spent much of the war growing up on Naval air stations. That’s when I knew I wanted to become a Navy fighter pilot. After an unsuccessful attempt at college, I left school in 1954 with intent to enlist in the U.S. Navy Aviation Cadet program.  My father, however, suggested I’d have a better chance of becoming a fighter pilot if I joined the USAF. So on 23 February 1954, I enlisted in the USAF as an Aviation Cadet.

I received my wings and commission at Williams AFB, AZ on 1 June 1955 with an assignment to fly F-100s.  After T-33 gunnery at Del Rio TX, I went to Nellis AFB, NV to fly F-100s. I was supposed to be in the first F-100 class at Nellis but they unable to keep a sufficient number operational so they put us in an F-86 class.  Looking back I am glad they did. Flying the F-86 was a fantastic experience. (Photo 2)

I reported to the 436th Fighter Day Squadron at George AFB to fly F-100s in November 1955.

F-100A

I checked out in the F-100A on 18 Jan 1956.   I flew the A for 74 sorties, most of them in a clean configuration, many times three sorties a day.  I accumulate 76:05 hours in the A in just over 2 months. In April 56 the wing converted to F-100Cs.  

It was a great time to be assigned to George AFB.  Many Korean Aces were at George and they taught us a lot.  In the three years of flying As and Cs at George, I learned how to fly fighters.  Most of the sorties we flew were 2v2 or 4v4. Of course, in those days it was all Welded-Wing — shut up, and check 6. 

My first flight commander was Pete Fernandez, 14.5 MiG kills in Korea.  The As at George at the time of my checkout were all big tail, but the concern remained about controlling adverse yaw, particularly getting behind the power curve … and particularly by brand new brown bars!  I remember well the guidance Pete gave me … “Never let the jet get below 200 Kts on the base to final turn.”   I figured if an ace with 14.5 MiG kills kept it at 200 Kts, I would add 5 or 10 more just for my inexperience.  As you will remember the F-100 drag chute limit for deployment was 180 Kts. I would hate to tell you how many times after I lowered the nose gear I waited till the jet slowed below 180.  As a consequence, we blew a lot of tires (boy, the magnesium sure burns bright) trying to stop the jet before hitting the barrier.  Blowing tires was accepted, but Bull Harris our Wing CC would ship you off to SAC missiles if you got a tail skid on landing.  So we kept the power up even after Bob Hover demonstrated how to properly land the F-100.  A tail skid or worse got you an invitation to the pleasures of sitting in a SAC missile silo.

I had the privilege of flying Pete’s wing many times while rat racing and he was by far the smoothest and easiest lead I ever flew with.

Regarding adverse yaw, it was the nature of the beast and we learned how to deal with it. Early on, however, I didn’t understand what was happening that caused the jet to yaw to the point of departure. I just kept on cross controlling to keep it turning until the tail was about to take the lead and then I unloaded a bit.  

To illustrate my lack of understanding of what was going on, frequently after unloading I would have to use the rudder trim to center the ball!  It never dawned on me that something other than adverse yaw was occurring until one day in a debrief I commented to my flight lead, Gordon Scharnhorst, on the need to retrim the jet. Suspecting it was mechanical; he took me out to an A and told me to get in.  Because I was six feet four I always ran the seat full down. He immediately found the problem. When pulling Gs and stepping on right rudder while cross controlling the jet the connection between the thigh and calf bladder of my G-suit inflated pushing the rudder trim to the left.  Therefore unwittingly, I was responsible for the installation of a guard on the rudder trim switch — a very minor claim to fame to say the least!

F-100C

I checked out in the F-100C on 30 April 1956.  Many changes came with the introduction of the C models; we had additional fuel in the wings, antiskid, started to air refueling and an upgraded J-57 engine.  Also, the 479th Day Fighter Wing became the 479th Tactical Fighter Wing and we started flying ground attack training missions.  When we became a TFW the squadron UE went from 24 to 18 and we added the 476TFS. (Photo #3) L to R: Phil Edsal, Dick Derick, Dave Clardy, Bill Spencer, me. In front are, Maj Bob Schimp Squadron CC and Col Bull Harris, Wing CC.  All except me have now flown West.

Most importantly, with the C we had J-57s with more thrust.  The A model J-57 was rated dry at 9,220 and 14,800 in afterburner.  The C model J-57 was rated dry at 10,200 and 16,000 in burner. When we picked up a new Cs at Palmdale the engines were trimmed to their max rated power.  So for the 45-minute flight to George, we flew the best jets, clean and fast. By climbing to 40 K and pushing the jet over to half–g and lighting the burner I easily attained 1.5 Mach on most new C flights.  Of course, upon landing at George the C’s like the A’s, the J-57s were trimmed down to extend the engine life — so we were told.

As for the wet wings, we liked having more internal fuel, but at George, in the summer heat, they leaked on the ramp.  Later NA came up with better ceils and they, for the most part, solved the fuel leak problem.

The anti-skid was more of a problem.  Initially, we kept the anti-skid engaged until we shut down in the refueling pits —- that is until we had a jet go through the pit with the anti-skid merrily preventing the brakes from working.  After someone had the same problem in the de-arming area, we were instructed to turn antiskid off when exiting the runway. Of course, there were also cases when the antiskid malfunctioned on landing that resulted in blown tires.  

Initial attempts at air refueling were, to put it mildly, exciting.  As far as I know, the 479TFW was the first operational unit to undertake air refueling.  (Might have been Forster, but in any case, we had only limited info on how to do it.) We used KB50 tankers with the original C model short, straight refueling probe.  Because the C didn’t have flaps, we were very close to minimum airspeed at hookup and a pretty high angle of attack. As you approached the basket the airflow around the nose of the jet sucked it down and out of sight. Because of the slow speed, high angle of attack, all initial engagements with the basket were made blind.  This resulted in some amazing misses. I recall one missed engagement that resulted in basket and hose going over the wing, lopping over the fuselage and nearly hitting the left horizontal stabilizer. In a number of cases, the basket cracked canopies. The boys at NA attempted to help by modifying the nozzle on the short probe to have a 6-degree down angle.  That helped increase the number of successful engagements, but it did not solve the blind hookup problem. That wasn’t solved until they came up with big bent up refueling probe on the D model.

Even though, as TFS we were now hurling our pink bodies at the ground in dive, strafe, and skip bombing at Cuddyback Range, we still flew plenty of ACM and hot missions on the rag.

One thing I got to do while I was in the 436th FDS was to fly my father in a T-33.  It was a great experience for both of us. In fact, the landing approach speed for landing the T-33 was faster than many of the speed records he set in early naval aviation.  (Photo #4)

Of all the Huns I had the privilege to fly, the C was by far the best.  I flew Cs at George until Aug 58 when I transferred to Etain AB, France, and the F-100D.

Europe and the F-100 D

I arrived at Etain Air Base, France in August 1958 on a cold, cloudy afternoon.  The ceiling appeared to me to be around 500 feet. As we drove on the base two things got my attention.  First, all the aircraft parked on the rosettes were listing to the left because they had two external fuel tanks on the right wing and only one on the left.  I soon learned that this asymmetrical configuration allowed for the quick upload of a nuclear weapon on the left intermediate station and that we would fly almost all our routine mission in that configuration.    The second thing that got my attention was when I saw two Huns appear out of the murk in the same asymmetrical configuration and land in formation! For a jet driver that had spent over three years flying mostly under cloudless conditions in the West, it was clear to me this assignment was going to be a major change, not just in mission but also in ‘normal’ flying weather.

I was assigned to the 8th TFS of the 49th TFW.   It had been just over seven months since the 49th wing had converted from flying F-86s to F-100s.  Upon checking in to my new squadron I became the most experienced F-100 pilot in the squadron.  My 750 hours in the Hun was greater than the combined total of the squadron.

Even though Etain AB was the home of the 49th we did not pull nuclear alert in France.  The French government prohibited U.S. nuclear weapons in France so we pulled nuclear alert at Spangdahlem Air Base in Germany.  Our alert pad at Spang was typical. We were on15-minute alert 24 hours a day. Initially, the aircraft was loaded with MK 12 nuclear weapons.  As our older versions of the F-100D were replaced with the dash 90Ds and we upgraded to MK 28 nuclear weapon, which could be loaded on the centerline station,  We then were able to drop the 1-E asymmetrical three external tank configuration and go to a four tank symmetrical configuration.

In early 1959 I was selected to join a Headquarters USAFE special training team.  The team was formed for the purpose of training pilots in nuclear weapons delivery in French, Danish, and Turkish fighter units that had recently re-equipped with F-100Ds.  I was assigned as team weapons officer. I spent nearly 18 months on the team training Turkish and Danish squadrons.

Turkey

We trained two Turk squadrons, the 111th and 112th, at Eskisehir, Turkey (Photo #5).   It took about four months to train each squadron.  One of my first jobs was to assist the Turks in laying out the run-in line on their gunnery range at Konia.  (For all of you that flew on the Konia range, my apologies. Little did I know that Konia was dead center on the Stork migration route.  It wasn’t until we were training the second squadron that I had the occasion to pass close by one of those critters while at 500kts at 500 feet above the ground!  Thank God we never hit one during training of the Turks.)

Conclusion

From the first fighter I flew, the F-86, in 1955 until the last fighter I flew, the F-16, in 1985 the day before I retired, I was fortunate to do exactly what I set out to do.  In 1955, I was full of attitude and not much brains and the F-100 as by far the hottest airplane in the Air Force at that time. It was the jet that every fighter pilot wanted to fly.  I was one of the lucky ones. Flying the F-100 I learned a lot about flying single seat, single engine jet fighters. In 32 years in the AF, I was fortunate to be operationally qualified to fly the best jet fighters in the Air Force, but it was the 1,700 hours in the Hun that taught me the most and demanded the most of my limited skills.

Units - Education - Awards - Flight Info

Units Assigned

  • 1955 – 1955 94th Fighter Squadron, Nellis AFB, NV (F-86E/F)
  • 1955 – 1956 436th Fighter Day Squadron, George AFB, CA (F-100A)
  • 1956 – 1958 476th Fighter Day Squadron, George AFB, CA (F-100C)
  • 1958 – 1961 8th Tactical Fighter Squadron, Etain AB, France and Spangdahlem AB, Germany with one year with 112th and 111th Turkish TFS Eskisehir Tukey and six months with the 727th TFS Karup Denmark all in (F-100D)
  • 1961 – 1962 436th Tactical Fighter Squadron, George AFB, CA (F-104C)
  • 1962 – 1963 435th Tactical Fighter Squadron, George AFB, CA (F-104C)
  • 1963 – 1965 ALO 1st Bde, 101 Abn Div, Ft Campbell, KY (F-84F with Springfield, IL ANG)
  • 1965 – 1966 ALO 1st Bde, 101 Abn Div, RVN (O-1)
  • 1966 – 1967 Fighter Ops, Hq TAC, Langley AFB, VA
  • 1967 – 1968 Univ of Omaha, Omaha, NE
  • 1968 – 1969 Air Command and Staff, Maxwell AFB, AL
  • 1969 – 1971 Hq USAF, AO in Plans and Policy, Pentagon, Washington, D.C.
  • 1971 – 1972 Student, Canadian National Defense College, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
  • 1972 – 1972 (6 months) B Course student in F4-Cs Luke AFB, AZ en route to Thailand
  • 1972 – 1973 Ex to the Dir Plans and Operations, Hq USAF, Pentagon, Washington, D.C.
  • 1973 – 1976 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, ADO, DO and Vice CC, Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson, AZ (A-7)
  • 1976 – 1977 602nd Tactical Control Wing CC (OV-10, O-2)
  • 1977 – 1978 Staff officer in DO shop at Hq TAC, Langley AFB, VA
  • 1978 – 1980 31st Tactical Fighter Wing, CC (F-4E)
  • 1980 – 1981 832nd Air Division CC, Luke AFB, AZ (F-4C, F-15, F-104G, F-5)
  • 1981 – 1982 Dir Plans, Hq TAC, Langley AFB, VA
  • 1982 – 1984 Director of Operational Requirements, Hq USAF, Pentagon
  • 1984 – 1985 16th AF CC, Torrejon AB, Spain (F-16)
  • Retired from USAF, October 1, 1985

Awards & Decorations

 Distinguished Service Medal
 Legion of Merit (with oak leaf cluster)
 Distinguished Flying Cross (with oak leaf cluster)
 Bronze Star Medal
 Meritorious Service Medal (with 2 oak leaf clusters)
 Air Medal (4 oak leaf clusters)
 Air Force Commendation Medal
 Army Commendation Medal (with oak leaf cluster)
 Combat Readiness Medal

Flight Info

F-86E/F
F-100 A/C/D
F-104 C/G
F-84
O-1
O-2
A-7
OV-10
F-4 C/E
F-5
F-15
F-16

Military Education

1954 Enlisted AvCavs
1955 Pilot Class 55 O
1961 Squadron Officer’s Course
1969 Air Command and Staff DG
1971-1972 Canadian National Defense College

Civilian Education

1952 Cocoa HS
1952 1952-1953 Georgia Tech
1968 BGS University of Omaha
1969 MBA Auburn University

F-100A

I checked out in the F-100A on 20 January 1956 and flew A’s till 30 Apr 1956 when we got F-100C’s.  Flew C’s till I transferred to Etain AB in August 1958.

Photos